LGBT Studies Course Descriptions

LGBT 200 Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies.

(No Prerequisite.) An interdisciplinary study of the historical and social contexts of personal, cultural and political aspects of LGBT life. Sources from a variety of fields, such as anthropology, history, psychology, sociology, and women's studies, focusing on writings by and about LGBT people. Required course for LGBT Studies Certificate or Minor. Core SB & D. GenEd History and Social Sciences & Understanding Plural Societies.

LGBT 265 Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Literatures

(No Prerequisite.) Not open to students who have completed ENGL 265. Credit will be granted for only one of the following: ENGL 265 or LGBT 265. An exploration of literary and cultural expressions of sexuality and gender. Study of a range of historical periods and literary genres, such as essay, poetry, novel, drama, film. Topics include sexual norms and dissidence, gender identity and expression, the relationship between aesthetic forms and sexual subjectivity. Interpretation of texts particularly through the lens of queer theory. Examination of how sex and gender intersect with other forms of difference, including race and class. This course fills the lower division literature, art, or culture requirement for the LGBT Studies Certificate or Minor. Core HL & D. GenEd Humanities & Understanding Plural Societies.

LGBT 285 Homophobia in the U.S. Society in the New Millenium

(No Prerequisite. This is an "I" series course offering.) Not open to students who have completed LGBT 289I. Credit will be granted for only one one of the following: LGBT 285 or LGBT 289I. An interdisciplinary investigation of the evolving forms of homophobia that continue to thrive and grow in the contemporary U.S., despite historical gains. Special attention to manifestations of homophobia in U.S. social, cultural, political, and legal arenas such as: popular culture/media, religious and cultural/ethnic communities, state and federal legislation, and queer subcultures. Focus on students' powers and responsibilities within struggles to end discrimination based on sexuality. Core SB & D. GenEd History and Social Sciences, Understanding Plural Societies, I-Series.

LGBT 291 International Perspectives on Lesbian and Gay Studies

(No Prerequisite.) Also offered as CMLT291. Not open to students who have completed CMLT291. Credit will be granted for only one of the following: CMLT291 or LGBT291. Exploration of the construction and representation of sexualities in culture around the globe, with particular emphasis on literature and media. Core D.

LGBT 298 Special Topics in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies

(No Prerequisite.) Repeatable to 9 credits if content differs. Study of particular themes and issues in LGBT studies. Past special topics courses have included: Queer American Cultures, and Sexuality and Gender in Popular Culture. Core D. GenEd Understanding Plural Societies

LGBT 298C Special Topics in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies: Histories of "Deviant" Women: Crones, Comedians, and Criminals

(No Prerequisite.) Historical and contemporary examination of how, where, when, and for whom the category of “deviant woman” is produced and regulated. Possible units include the construction of sex, gender, and bodies; notions of criminality and comedy; and narratives of witchcraft. This course fills the lower division literature, art, or culture requirement for the LGBT Studies Certificate or Minor. Core D. GenEd Understanding Plural Societies.

LGBT 298D Special Topics in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies: Digital Queers - Public Space, Art, and Performance in the Digital Age

(No Prerequisite.) Digital Queers is first and foremost about the creative exploration and practice of queer theory in everyday digital life. We will investigate public spaces and institutions using a range of approaches, from reading and discussion, to making art and performance. Most importantly, students will be experimenting with, and creating their own theoretical practice. There is no experience or skill required or needed; just an open mind and a willingness to try. Students will be introduced to a broad but considered range of topics, including queer theory, public space, digital media, art, and activism. We will use these texts to explore multiple methodologies and approaches, including games, psychogeography, time-based art (video, sound, installation), and performance. This course fills the lower division literature, art, or culture requirement for the LGBT Studies Certificate or Minor. Core D. GenEd Understanding Plural Societies.

LGBT 298L Special Topics in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies: Introduction to Queer Latina/o Studies

(No Prerequisite.) Since the1990s, LGBT and Queer histories and identities have emerged within academic discussions generating an influential theoretical field for the analysis of culture, identity, and politics. Simultaneously, Latina/o histories and identities have garnered questions, debates, and theories in response to immigration, labor, activism & politics, and cultural production. Together, LGBTQ AND Latina/o cultures and identities open new pathways of research and analysis in areas of cultural studies. Using interdisciplinary methodologies and approaches and integrating a scope of different, yet intersecting, LGBTQ and Latina/o histories and identities, this course explores how Queer Latina/o cultures and identities together have engaged in art and literature to interact with space, politics, and activism or latinidad, testimonio, and activismo. By utilizing these analytic frameworks, this course explores the cultural production of Queer Latina/o cultures, primarily through art, literature, and other medias to underscore how engagement with politics, policies, and institutions are practiced. This course fills the lower division literature, art, or culture requirement for the LGBT Studies Certificate or Minor. Core D. GenEd Understanding Plural Societies.

LGBT 298Q Special Topics in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies: Queers, Arts, and Culture

(No Prerequisite.) An interdisciplinary study of the historical and social contexts of LGBT contributions to art and culture. Sources from a variety of fields, including history, literature, visual arts, drama, film, crafts, and women's studies, focusing on art by and about LGBT people. This course fills the lower division literature, art, or culture requirement for the LGBT Studies Certificate or Minor. Core D. GenEd Understanding Plural Societies.

LGBT 298R Special Topics in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies: Digital Queers - Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Art and Culture

(No Prerequisite.) LGBT Art and Culture examines lesbian’s, gay men’s, bisexual people’s and transgender people’s creative products in selected examples of music, film, art, drama, dance, poetry, fiction, memoir, and other literature, and it explores LGBT identities and communities in relation to families, religion, education, ethnicity, class, history, and sexuality, within cultural traditions shaped by LGBT people. We will consider the cultural productions of LGBT artists working in a variety of media and genres. Through the readings, discussions, and assignments, you will develop skills to analyze written and visual texts with particular attention to how sex, gender, race, class, sexuality, sexual orientation, and other systems of power shape people’s everyday lives. This course fills the lower division literature, art, or culture requirement for the LGBT Studies Certificate or Minor. Core D. GenEd Understanding Plural Societies.

LGBT 327 LGBT Film and Video

(Prerequisite: Junior standing.) Comparative analysis of forms, themes, and the politics of representation in film and video by and/or about LGBT people. This course begins from the premise that movies are designed to give us a variety of meaningful viewing experiences, sometimes pleasurable, sometimes not. The class teaches a range of analytical approaches for understanding how films create meanings and what those meanings may be. In this course, we will trace both the diversity and similarities between global and Western representations of what we call homosexuality, bisexuality, and transgender identities as represented in film and video. Film selections might include works directed by Lisa Cholodenko, Ang Lee, Cheryl Dunye, Marlon Riggs, Paul Verhoven, Deepa Mehta, Alfred Hitchcock, John Cameron Mitchell, and Kimberly Pierce. This course fills the upper division literature, art, or culture requirement for the LGBT Studies Certificate or Minor. Core D. GenEd Humanities and Understanding Plural Societies.

LGBT 350 Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender People and Communication

(Prerequisite: LGBT200 & permission of the program.) Study of differences, stereotypes, and values distinguishing LGBT people and of effective means of communicating such differences to non-LGBT people. Emphasis on contemporary LGBT life and on the development of didactic skills. Preparation and presentation of forums on LGBT people; facilitation of workshops in various outreach locations (residence halls, Greek system, classes). This course fills the upper division personal, social, political, or historical requirement for the LGBT Studies Certificate or Minor. GenEd Scholarship in Practice and Cultural Competency.

LGBT 359 Special Topics in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Literatures

(Prerequisite: two lower-level English courses, at least one in literature.) Repeatable to 9 credits if content differs. Also offered as ENGL359. Study of selected writers or particular themes in Lesbian, Gay Bisexual, and Transgender literatures. Past Special Topics courses have included: The Beginnings of Queer Identity, 1660-1900, Queer Film and Video, LGBT Writing in the U.S., Queer Poetics, or Gay is Very American, and Love, Sex, and Poetry in the Long 19th Century. This course fills the upper division literature, art, or culture requirement for the LGBT Studies Certificate or Minor.

LGBT 359B: Special Topics in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Literatures: Queer Poetics, or Gay is Very American

(Prerequisite: two lower-level English courses, at least one in literature.) An intensive study of lesbian/gay/bisexual/transgender/queer inscriptions in American poetry, this course will examine the queerness of nineteenth-century poets Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson and will then turn to the poetic productions and cultural reproductions of poets such as Elizabeth Bishop, H.D., Gertrude Stein, Judy Grahn, Adrienne Rich, Audre Lorde, and Minnie Bruce Pratt, as well as Hart Crane, Allen Ginsberg, Langston Hughes, James Baldwin, Essex Hemphill, Frank O’Hara, and Paul Monette. While we will probe ways in which LGBT or queer expressions are inflected by issues of race, gender, class, and high/low culture, we will especially scrutinize ways in which the performances and receptions of poets identified (by themselves or others) as LGBT or queer may perpetuate, challenge, and modify cultural mythologies about sexualities and their relevance to literary endeavors. Written assignments will be a short paper and a longer, more ambitious essay (10-15 pp.) exploring in depth some aspect raised by our course of study, as well as a reading journal (maintaining this journal will count as one of your exams). Collaborative writing endeavors are welcomed. Our meetings will often depend upon group work for leading discussions in the individual sessions, and each class member will participate in a group presentation. This course fills the upper division literature, art, or culture requirement for the LGBT Studies Certificate or Minor.

LGBT 359C Special Topics in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Literatures: Queer Films and Videos

(Prerequisite: two lower-level English courses, at least one in literature.) This course charts the development of Queer Cinema from the late 1940s to the present day. Analyzing the work of directors including Kenneth Anger, Sadie Benning, John Waters, Todd Haynes, Cheryl Dunye, Rose Troche, Gregg Araki, John Cameron Mitchell, Marlon Riggs, Jennie Livingston, Isaac Julien, John Greyson, and Pedro Almodóvar, among others, this course will examine prevalent themes, conventions, aesthetics, narrative techniques, and cultural contribution of Queer filmmakers telling Queer stories through film and video. Some of the topics we will grapple with include positioning Race within Queer Cinema, multi-lingual and multi-national Queer Cinemas, Sex in Queer Film, and filming Queer bodies. Course Requirements: viewing films outside of class, short response papers, a larger final paper, occasional quizzes, active class participation, and a final exam. This course fills the upper division literature, art, or culture requirement for the LGBT Studies Certificate or Minor.

LGBT 359D Special Topics in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Literatures: Queer Adaptations in Film, Fiction, and TV

(Prerequisite: two lower-level English courses, at least one in literature.) This course studies changes in LGBT/Queer characters, story lines, settings, and other issues when stories shift from one medium to another: from novel or play to film, from film to fan fiction, from TV to spinoff novel, etc. Some of these adaptations "straighten" the original text and mute or erase the queerness present there, while other adaptations highlight the presence of non-normative sexuality. Students' purpose in the course will be to consider the possible reasons behind changes made in adapting stories for different media, including the intended audience, the historical and cultural situation, and other factors. The course also pays close attention to both the conventions of genre and to the limits and possibilities of different media on what kinds of stories get told in what kinds of ways. This course fills the upper division literature, art, or culture requirement for the LGBT Studies Certificate or Minor.

LGBT 359K Special Topics in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Literatures: Sexual Poetics

(Prerequisite: two lower-level English courses, at least one in literature.) This team-taught course will explore the erotics of American and British poetry from the nineteenth century to the present day. Many of the “major,” most canonized poets in the American and British traditions are widely recognized as lesbian, gay, or queer (Emily Dickinson, Walt Whitman, Amy Levy, Gerard Manley Hopkins, Elizabeth Bishop, Adrienne Rich, Marilyn Hacker, Essex Hemphill, the previous American poet laureate Kay Ryan, and the current British poet laureate, Carol Ann Duffy), and many others foreground sex, gender, and desire as key dynamics of their work (John Keats, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, and Sylvia Plath, just to name a few). Our class will take a transatlantic approach to thinking about poetry, combining the expertise of one specialist in American poetry and one in the British tradition. While we will probe ways in which poetic erotics are inflected by issues of race, gender, class, and high/low culture, we will especially scrutinize ways in which the performances and receptions of poets identified (by themselves or others) as LGBT or queer may perpetuate, challenge, and modify cultural mythologies about sexualities and their relevance to national, literary, artistic, aesthetic, and political endeavors. Classwork will include two essays (5 pages), active participation, and a final exam. This course fills the upper division literature, art, or culture requirement for the LGBT Studies Certificate or Minor.

LGBT 359M: Special Topics in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Literatures: Queer Comedy

(Prerequisite: two lower-level English courses, at least one in literature.) Comedy is always queer, challenging conventional perspectives, turning our attentions to the unexpected, and turning the expected and accepted on its head, as it were. In this course, though we will make extensive use of the world wide web, the WWW stands for Witty Women Writers—bold, wry, playful, challenging “women” (both actual females and males in drag) who use humor to facilitate more full expression. Humor serves a wide variety of purposes. Comic relief can liven the tiresome mundane, ease great pain, inflect unbearable news or information so that it is bearable and can be received. Especially important for our course of study is that queers, women, and other groups traditionally regarded as minorities or disfranchised have long used humor to contest rigid and repressive orthodoxies in the hope of resituating their own relationship to society as a whole and thus transform society, or at least their relation to and status in society. Such use of humor will center our critical inquiry. We will explore by reading and rereading, from the page and from screens (of computer, cinema, and television), selected works from centuries of transatlantic literature and artistic performance. Though they are not quite like Wanda Sykes or Margaret Cho (whom we will examine), we will read writers such as Jane Austen (!), Emily Dickinson, Gertrude Stein, Allen Ginsberg, Essex Hemphill, as well as examine the work of a number of gay comedians, and Whoopi Goldberg, Lucille Ball, Mary Tyler Moore (!), Lily Tomlin and Jane Wagner, and Ellen Degeneres as we rethink customary divisions between high and low, public and private art and artistic performance. Queer cartoonists such as Alison Bechdel and Howard Cruse are also likely to be part of our “mystery ride” through queer comedy. Issues of race, gender, ethnicity, sexuality, and class will inform our critical inquiry. If you don’t see a comic or writer on this list whom you’d really like to study, email me and make a suggestion. Two papers, an oral presentation, a final, and an appreciation for the importance of having fun required. This course fills the upper division literature, art, or culture requirement for the LGBT Studies Certificate or Minor.

LGBT 386 Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Community Organization Internship

(Prerequisite: 9 credits in LGBT Studies & permission of the program.) Supervised internship experience with a community organization that expressly serves lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people. Students will be expected to relate course material to experience in an analysis of an organization's activities. Students in the LGBT Certificate or Minor program can use LGBT386 to fill the Capstone Course requirement. GenEd Cultural Competency.

LGBT 398C Special Topics in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies: Queer and Trans Collaborations

(Prerequisite: Junior standing; LGBT 200 or permission of the program.) An interdisciplinary investigation of queer social theory, with particular attention to discussions of assimilationist and radical politics within queer and trans communities. Topics explored include same-sex marriage, capitalism, and consumerism. Focus on students’ participation as informed, conscientious, and responsible citizens in the struggle for social justice for all. This course fills the upper division personal, social, political, or historical requirement for the LGBT Studies Certificate or Minor.

LGBT 398Q Special Topics in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies: Applied Contextual Leadership: Facilitation and Leadership Skills in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, or Ally Organizations

(Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.) Also offered as EDCP 318Q. Interested students must determine an instructor-approved leadership or facilitation project before signing up. Students will hone skills in a wide range of areas, including facilitation, interpersonal communication, organization building, and organizing for social change. Students will apply evidence-based leadership practices in an LGBTQA organizational context, and will be expected to analyze their learning and demonstrate growth. Contact Nicholas Sakurai for more information and permission to register. Approved LGBT elective. GenEd Understanding Plural Societies.

LGBT 407 Gay and Lesbian Philosophy

Also offered as PHIL407. Not open to students who have completed PHIL407. Credit will be granted for only one of the following: PHIL407 or LGBT407. An examination in historical and social context of personal, cultural, and political aspects of gay and lesbian life, paying particular attention to conceptual, ontological, epistemological, and social justice issues. This course fills the upper division personal, social, political, or historical requirement for the LGBT Studies Certificate or Minor. Core D.

LGBT 448 Special Topics in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies

(Prerequisite: Junior standing; LGBT 200 or permission of the program.) Repeatable to 9 credits if content differs. Not open to students who have completed CMLT498Y. Formerly CMLT498Y. Developments in theories and methods of LGBT Studies, with emphasis upon interaction between the humanities and the social sciences in the elaboration of this interdisciplinary area of scholarship. Past special topics courses have included: Law and Identities, LGBT Families, Asian American Sexualities, and Sex and the City. Core D. GenEd Understanding Plural Societies.

LGBT 448A Special Topics in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies: HIV/AIDS: Politics, Culture, and Science

(Prerequisite: Junior standing; LGBT 200 or permission of the program.) This course introduces the political, social, cultural, and medical constructions of the HIV/AIDS pandemic. Drawing upon diverse interdisciplinary texts, we will investigate the pandemic’s historical epidemiology; state, medical, and grassroots responses to AIDS; and evolving media representations of AIDS. We will explore both continuities and changes in these dynamics from local, national, and transnational perspectives. To do so, we will focus primarily on examples from the United States and the Global South. This course fills the upper division personal, social, political, or historical requirement for the LGBT Studies Certificate or Minor. Core D. GenEd Understanding Plural Societies.

LGBT 448C Special Topics in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies: Sex and the City

(Prerequisite: Junior standing; LGBT 200 or permission of the program.) This class will adopt an interdisciplinary approach to the study of gender, race, sexuality, and geography. The class will include an expansive understanding of marginalized sexualities to include those outside of dominant racialized concepts of heterosexuality. Possible units include Progressive-era city reforms, sub-cultural studies of the Chicago School, the history of pre-Stonewall sexual minority communities, “slumming” and sex tourism, the Moynihan Report and “culture of poverty” debates, race-, gender-, and sexuality-based social movements, theories of the public versus private sphere, accessibility and the built environment, theories of race, gender, and sexual migration, public sex, gentrification, street safety and the politics of violence, new transnational human rights and development models, and the language of space in counter-publics and cultural production. This course fills the upper division personal, social, political, or historical requirement for the LGBT Studies Certificate or Minor. Core D. GenEd Understanding Plural Societies.

LGBT 448E Special Topics in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies: Asian American Sexualities

(Prerequisite: Junior standing; LGBT 200 or permission of the program.) Grounded in interdisciplinary approaches, this course investigates Asian American Sexualities from multiple conceptual and methodological angles. Paying close attention to historical, cultural, political, and social constructions of sexual knowledge and identities, the central purpose of this course is to broadly examine the multiple meanings of sexuality to Asian Americans, a diverse group defined by limitless differences. Approved LGBT elective. Core D. GenEd Understanding Plural Societies.

LGBT 448F Special Topics in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies: LGBT Families

(Prerequisite: Junior standing; LGBT 200 or permission of the program.) In this course, we examine the shifting meanings and practices of families within LGBTQ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer) communities and vis-à-vis notions of “the family” in the United States more broadly. We consider the myriad configurations of family created by LGBTQ-identified people, and how these have intersected with, assimilated into, and deconstructed the very notion of “the family” in the U.S. national imaginary. We explore the ways in which both the concept of family and actual families are deployed as “proof” of authenticity by advocates and opponents of LGBTQ family formations. We reflect on how the increasing visibility of LGBTQ families has changed the face and direction of LGBTQ organizations and the legal regulation of LGBTQ families. We conclude by examining what it means to reconceptualize “families” both formally and informally in ways that are more inclusive. This course fills the upper division personal, social, political, or historical requirement for the LGBT Studies Certificate or Minor. Core D. GenEd Understanding Plural Societies.

LGBT 448G Special Topics in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies: Where the Wilde Things Are: Queer Identities in Drama and Performance

(Prerequisite: Junior standing.) The AIDS crisis of the 1980s brought gay lives into the forefront of cultural discussion. Yet, throughout the twentieth century, theatre presented a range of dramatic representations of queer lives, and it has been integral in shaping the public’s perceptions about sexuality and sexual identity as well as in influencing the ways queer communities think about and define themselves. This course looks at representations of queer identity in American theatre, starting with the rippling affect of the English plays of Oscar Wilde and his groundbreaking trial for "gross indecency" and ending with contemporary representations of queer identity in drama, performance art, and culture. The course will include a range of dramatic representation of queer identities, including the tortured characters of playwrights such as Lillian Hellman and Tennessee Williams, post-Stonewall assertions of gay pride in the plays of Mart Crowley, the politically-engaged response to AIDS crisis in the plays of Larry Kramer and Tony Kushner, and queer culture’s appropriation of “camp” in the works of John Cameron Mitchell, Tim Miller, and Holly Hughes. The course will also consider performative aspects of gay and lesbian culture off the traditional theatrical stage – from performance artists like Holly Hughes, to gay pride parades, to the performance of drag kings and queens. Approved LGBT elective. Core D. GenEd Understanding Plural Societies.

LGBT 448J Special Topics in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies: International LGBT Issues

(Prerequisite: Junior standing.) Investigation of sex, sexuality, and gender that focuses on specific political, social, and historical contexts of various countires and cultures. In particular, an examination of how non-normative sexualities and genders have been shaped by and have responded to histories of colonialism, transnational media, international non-governmental organizations, and the politics of the "global gay." This course fills the upper division personal, social, political, or historical requirement for the LGBT Studies Certificate or Minor. Core D. GenEd Understanding Plural Societies.

LGBT 448K Special Topics in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies: Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity, and Human Rights

(Prerequisite: Junior standing.) In an increasingly interconnected world, recent human rights violations against LGBT people have drawn unprecedented attention from the global community. In this course, we will explore how LGBT people and their allies have staked claims to inclusion in the international human rights system developed in the aftermath of World War II; the resistance to recognizing sexual orientation and gender identity/expression as protected categories under human rights law; and how LGBT human rights are intertwined with other critical issues in civil society. This course fills the upper division personal, social, political, or historical requirement for the LGBT Studies Certificate or Minor. Core D. GenEd Understanding Plural Societies.

LGBT 448L Special Topics in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies: Law and Identities

(Prerequisite: Junior standing; LGBT 200 or permission of the program.) This course is designed to allow students to explore the complex and contested interactions between the law and the construction of group and individual identities. Students will study theories of identity and community including racial, gender, religious, national, and sexual, and will focus on how the law has been central in defining, rewarding, and punishing difference. After a general examination of how diverse communities define themselves and their legal and contemporary problems, the class will engage with the current research of faculty and outside speakers. Approved LGBT elective. Core D. GenEd Understanding Plural Societies.

LGBT 448M Special Topics in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies: Advanced Study of Queer Latina/o Cultures: Migration and Sexuality

(Prerequisite: Junior standing; LGBT 200 or permission of the program.) With a focus on LGBTQ Latina/o sexuality and migration, this course introduces students to the operation of “queer” as seen through various artistic, legal, historic, scholarly, and popular discourses relating to LGBTQ Latina/o cultures and identities. We will examine the conventional and unconventional ways LGBTQ Latina/o sexualities “move” through these discourses and determine how migrations (or movements) alter the expression, representation, and production of LGBTQ Latina/o cultures and identities. The expression, representation, and cultural production of LGBTQ Latina/o cultures and identities will be examined through a wide-range of both primary and secondary sources, which will be used by students to develop an original research project. Students will be introduced to the theoretical frameworks used when examining the shifting categories of race, sexuality, and other identities, and we will integrate campus resources, events, and speakers into our discussions to illuminate these frameworks. This course fills the upper division literature, art, or culture requirement for the LGBT Studies Certificate or Minor. Core D. GenEd Understanding Plural Societies.

LGBT 448Q Special Topics in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies: Queer Citizenship: Perspectives on Bodies, Sexualities, and Performances

(Prerequisite: Junior standing) What does it mean to “queer” citizenship? In this class, we will examine the processes and practices of citizenship in everyday life with a specific focus on LGBTQ cultures and identities. Beginning with Thomas Marshall’s concept of citizenship, we will examine the history of citizenship in the U.S. with a “queer” lens and identify how exclusion and inclusion operate within citizenship formations of “minority” groups. We will examine the mobilizations and political and cultural affiliations of LGBTQ communities to understand the changing historical and material contexts of citizenship that produce new forms of identity and new forms of belonging. Citizenship is neither stable nor fixed, but rather, a set of processes performed through the body. We will examine how bodies activate different cultural expressions to perform citizenship. Citizenship statuses are continually redefined, negotiated, and debated as they come to be articulated within different forms of nationalist discourses and cultural traditions.

This course seeks to understand how marginalized or “minority” LGBTQ groups resist, negotiate, and/or incorporate issues of citizenship in their everyday lives primarily through various artistic expressions. Going beyond legal frameworks of citizenship, but without ignoring them, this course reframes citizenship to highlight the cultural aspects of identity that have been excluded from legal discourse to underscore the expressive, communal, and artistic frames that create different forms of membership illustrating LGBTQ self-making and self-determination. Finally, we will examine how LGBTQ cultures, sexualities, and identities have changed, disrupted, or modified early conventions of citizenship and theorize the potentials for a 21st-Century "queer" citizenship. This course fills the upper division literature, art, or culture requirement for the LGBT Studies Certificate or Minor. Core D. GenEd Understanding Plural Societies.

LGBT 448R Special Topics in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies: From Ricky Ricardo to Jennifer Lopez: Exploring Latina/o Gender and Sexuality in Popular Culture

(Prerequisite: Junior standing) The objective of this course is to examine how race/ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and class are constructed by and in relation to Latin@s in US popular culture. Using the theory of intersectionality, we explore popular culture in the forms of television, film, music, and literature. Specifically, this course considers themese of hypersexuality, femininities/masculinities, identity across borders, assimilation, and Latin@ queerness. Approved LGBT elective. Core D. GenEd Understanding Plural Societies.

LGBT 448RR Special Topics in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies: Queer Mags and Rags: Studies in 20th Century LGBT Print Culture

(Prerequisite: Junior standing; LGBT 200 or permission of the program.) Throughout the 20th century, LGBT people produced, distributed, and read books, journal, magazines and newspapers. This printed material was central to LGBT identity formation and a variety of forms of activism. This course offers an interdisciplinary approach to the study of LGBT communities through publishing in the 20th century. Students will read original materials published by LGBT activists with scholarly analyses about the meanings of these printed artifacts. The class will explore these questions: what role does printed material have in LGBT identity formations? How are race, gender, and sexuality represented in LGBT printed material? How does print culture mobilize LGBT activism? What communications circuits do LGBT publishers use and create? How have they changed since the advent of the internet?

Particularly in the short but intense summer session, this is an intensive, but rewarding reading and research course. In addition to daily writing, students will complete a final project either individually or in a group that analyzes some aspect of historical or contemporary LGBT print culture. Approved LGBT elective. Core D. GenEd Understanding Plural Societies.

LGBT 459 Selected Topics in Sexuality and Literature

(Prerequisite: two lower-level English courses, at least one in literature.) Repeatable to 9 credits if content differs. Also offered as ENGL459. Detailed study of sexuality as an aspect of literary and cultural expression. Past courses have included: Trans Literature. This course fills the upper division literature, art, or culture requirement for the LGBT Studies Certificate or Minor.

LGBT 459A: Special Topics in Sexuality and Literature: Trans Literature

(Prerequisite: two lower-level English courses, at least one in literature.) For the purposes of this course, the term “trans literature” will describe literary and cinematic representations of a broad range of gender variance and ambiguity, from gender queerness and transitivity to hormonally and surgically defined transsexualism. Our study of novels, memoirs, autobiographies, and film will be supplemented by theoretical interventions by Judith Halberstam, Jay Prosser, Sandy Stone, Susan Stryker, and others who have recently brought trans issues to the forefront of LGBT and queer studies. Throughout, we will be interested in questions of embodiment; the role of medical and legal authorities in the construction of trans identities and of trans subjects challenging those constructions; issues of safety, risk, visibility, and passing; debates about whether the “proper” ending of trans stories is a sense of being “at home” in a male or female body or of being “in-between” genders. We will also give careful consideration to the ethics of producing and consuming trans stories. Work for the course will include response papers, a group oral presentation, a 12-15 page essay, and a final exam. This course fills the upper division literature, art, or culture requirement for the LGBT Studies Certificate or Minor.

LGBT 459M: Special Topics in Sexuality and Literature: American Poetry: Beginning to the Present (American Sexual Poetics Revisited)

(Prerequisite: two lower-level English courses, at least one in literature.) Many of the “major,” most canonized poets in American traditions are widely recognized as lesbian, gay, or queer (Emily Dickinson, Walt Whitman, Elizabeth Bishop, Hart Crane), and the various sexual dynamics of American literary history will contextualize our study as we begin by focusing on Dickinson and Whitman.

An intensive study of lesbian/gay/bisexual/transgender/queer inscriptions in American poetry, this course will then examine the poetic productions and cultural reproductions of poets such as the diverse group collected into the Masquerade anthology, including these names you might well recognize: W. H. Auden, Elizabeth Bishop, Willa Cather, Hart Crane, Countee Cullen, Alice Dunbar-Nelson, H.D., Angeline Weld Grimké, Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Langston Hughes, Sarah Orne Jewett, Amy Lowell, Mina Loy, Claude McKay, Herman Melville, Edna St. Vincent Millay, Richard Bruce Nugent, Muriel Rukeyser, George Santayana, May Sarton, Gertrude Stein, Henry David Thoreau. Besides those, we will read Adrienne Rich, Audre Lorde, Judy Grahn, and Minnie Bruce Pratt, Allen Ginsberg, James Baldwin, Essex Hemphill, Frank O’Hara, Paul Monette, May Swenson, and current poet laureate, Kay Ryan. While we will probe ways in which LGBT or queer expressions are inflected by issues of race, gender, class, and high/low culture, we will especially scrutinize ways in which the performances and receptions of poets identified (by themselves or others) as LGBT or queer may perpetuate, challenge, and modify cultural mythologies about sexualities and their relevance to national, literary, artistic, aesthetic, and political endeavors.

Written assignments will be a response paper, a short (2-3 pp.) paper and a longer, more ambitious essay (7-10 pp.) exploring in depth some aspect raised by our course of study, as well as regular participation in the discussion boards (this will count as one of your exams). Collaborative writing endeavors are welcomed. Our meetings will often depend upon group work for leading discussions in the individual sessions, and each class member will participate in a group presentation. This course fills the upper division literature, art, or culture requirement for the LGBT Studies Certificate or Minor.

LGBT 465 Theories of Sexuality and Literature

(Prerequisite: two lower-level English courses, at least one in literature.) Also offered as ENGL465. Not open to students who have completed ENGL465. Credit will be granted for only one of the following: ENGL465 or LGBT465. An in-depth study of the ways in which sexuality and sexual difference create or confound the conditions of meaning in the production of literary texts. Attention to psychoanalysis, history of sexuality, feminist theory, and other accounts of sexual identity. This course fills the upper division literature, art, or culture requirement for the LGBT Studies Certificate or Minor.

LGBT 488 Seminar in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies

(Prerequisites: 9 credits in LGBT Studies and permission of program.) Recommended: LGBT200 and LGBT265 or CMLT291. Repeatable to 9 credits if content differs. Not open to students who have completed CMLT498Y. Formerly CMLT498Y. Developments in theories and methods of LGBT Studies, with emphasis upon interaction between the humanities and the social sciences in the elaboration of this interdisciplinary area of scholarship. Past seminar topics have included: LGBTQ Politics and Social Movements, Race, Sexuality and the Transnational, Queering Citizenship. Students in the LGBT Certificate or Minor program can use LGBT488 to fill the Capstone Course requirement.

LGBT 488A Seminar in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies: Race, Sexuality, and the Transnational

(Prerequisites: 9 credits in LGBT Studies and permission of program.) Recommended: LGBT200 and LGBT265 or CMLT291. Repeatable to 9 credits if content differs. Not open to students who have completed CMLT498Y. Formerly CMLT498Y. This class adopts an historical and contemporary lens to investigate how racial and sexual difference have been produced and regulated--and systems of subjugation resisted--within "national" and "transnational" frames. Putting postcolonial, critical race, and queer theory into conversation, this class not only looks at those moments in which the construction of difference has been paired with structures of dominance, but also examines different epistemologies for understanding identity and strategies for routing power. Topics include colonial histories, postcolonial politics, diaspora, immigration, translation, globalization, human rights, neoliberalism, and nationalism. Interdisciplinary in scope, readings will draw from across the social sciences and humanities. Students in the LGBT Certificate or Minor program can use LGBT488 to fill the Capstone Course requirement.

LGBT 494 Lesbian Communities and Differences

(Prerequisite: One course in Women's Studies, preferably WMST200.) Also offered as WMST494. Not open to students who have completed WMST494. Credit will be granted for only one of the following: WMST494 or LGBT494. The meanings of lesbian communities across many lines of difference. Using lesbian feminists of the 1970s as a starting point, we will look both back and forward in history, tracing changes and exploring the meanings of these in their social and historical contexts. This course fills the upper division personal, social, political, or historical requirement for the LGBT Studies Certificate or Minor.

LGBT 499 Independent Study

(Prerequisite: LGBT200 and permission of department.) Individual Instruction course: contact department or instructor to obtain section number. Senior standing. Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. Directed research and analysis in LGBT Studies on a topic selected by the student.

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